Letter from the Editor

Aug. 17th, 2017 01:08 pm
[syndicated profile] thewildhunt_feed

Posted by Heather Greene

Letter from the editor

There are times when journalists and editors have to tackle subjects that are difficult, complicated, and even deeply contrary to their own personal world view. We go in anyway, because that is our mission and our purpose. We go in anyway, because that is our personal and professional directive, similar to a doctor or nurse that cures the sick no matter who they might be.

It is what we do.

While The Wild Hunt was once a successful news blog, it has developed into a recognized news agency with a small team of dedicated and professional news writers who work by the ethical standards expected of objective journalism and who have a passion for their work as members of our collective communities.

We do our best within our resources to go the full distance, even if that means setting aside personal feelings or going into uncharted territory, in order to get as close to the center of a very difficult and even painful story.

Reporting on Charlottesville was one of these times. The process was not easy for both me as editor and for Cara Schulz as the writer.

Personally speaking as a woman of Jewish heritage, I found that the weekend events triggered my own family-based traumas, and I had a difficult time keeping my “ear to the ground,” so to speak, in order to support Cara in her work. Seeing the swastika and hearing the antisemitic rhetoric chanted over and over was terrifying, recalling the many warnings I had heard as a child.

To recall the words of Jonathan Korman, do I have time to let the bread rise?

But I am also a professional journalist and an editor. As such, it is my belief that in order to empower our readership, especially in times of crisis, and to serve a greater purpose in our collective communities and our world, I must set that aside my own fears to bring you the highest quality, ethically-based reporting as my news team can accomplish.

We will not waiver in this mission. For us, it is not only a job but a passion, a spiritual calling, a service, and a craft.

I want to personally thank every one of our readers for visiting us daily, for supporting our wholly independent efforts, and for sharing our articles.

May we find peace and unity in the beauty of our differences.

Heather Greene
Managing Editor
The Wild Hunt

Royals #5 - "The Center of Things"

Aug. 17th, 2017 02:51 am
laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree posting in [community profile] scans_daily


There’s a thing readers should understand with this book: we’re not doing business in the normal way. There will be no tie-ins until we get back to Earth. We’re self-contained, telling our own story, beholden to nobody, and we’re on a trip out to the far reaches of Marvel Space, and we’re going to come back changed, and carrying something very special with us. -- Al Ewing

Read more... )

The Blood is the Life for 17-08-2017

Aug. 17th, 2017 11:00 am
miss_s_b: (Default)
[personal profile] miss_s_b
[syndicated profile] globalvoices_human_feed

Posted by Mwegelo Kapinga

However, Tanzanian President John Magufuli thinks it will.

Credit: PesaCheck.org

This article was originally published on PesaCheck.org, East Africa’s first fact-checking initiative.

Tanzanian President John Magufuli has called for teen mothers who get pregnant while they are still in school to be banned from returning once they have given birth.

Speaking at a rally in Chalinze, a small town in the eastern region of Pwani, President Magufuli chastised NGOs in Tanzania for encouraging teenage mothers to go back to school, stating that they were “finishing the country” and leading to a state of “moral decay” in Tanzania:

If a girl gets pregnant, if it is deliberate or by accident, gives birth and then returns to school, she will teach these others who haven’t given birth that this is okay. The same girl can then go again and get pregnant, give birth and go back to school. And again for a third time. Are we educating parents?

The president added that teen moms attending either primary or secondary school would be banned from going back once they have given birth:

I want to tell them, and those NGOs as well, that during my administration, no girl who has given birth will be allowed to go back to school .

The president went on to say that teen mothers could go elsewhere if they want to get an education, such as the Vocational Educational and Training Authority, or even taking up farming.

The announcement sparked outrage on social media, with Tanzanians using the #ArudiShule hashtag to criticize the move, especially considering that over 8,000 Tanzanian girls drop out of school every year due to pregnancy according to a Human Rights Watch report.

So, the question is, do student-mothers influence other students’ reproductive behaviour?

PesaCheck has researched the issue, with input from citizen-centered initiative Twaweza, and finds that President Magufuli’s statement is MISLEADING for the following reasons:

Causes of adolescent pregnancies

According to the Tanzania Health and Demographic Survey (THDS) 2015–16 the rate of adolescent pregnancies in mainland Tanzania is considerably high at 27%. What factors contribute to this figure?

publication by HakiElimu found citizens opinion on the key contributors to teen pregnancies includes low household income. The publication states that nearly 31% of the respondents (including parents and teenage girls) thought that poverty was a key factor, with difficult economic situations driving parents to marry off their children as they are not able to meet the basic needs of the female children.

The THDS report also shows that fertility varies with economic levels, decreasing with increasing household wealth. Wealthier households also have a higher age at first birth, meaning that poorer households are more likely to have younger mothers, most likely of schoolgoing age.

Corroborating this fact, a UNICEF report shows that one in six young women aged 15–19 is married in Tanzania. These girls get affected psychologically, meaning that many of them are unable to return to school once they drop out.

Another factor in the HakiElimu publication was “poor upbringing and teenage girls own personal desires”. They found that some parents don’t spend time on their children’s morals and upbringing. Another finding was the lack of reproductive education which helps teens to fully understand puberty. “A lot of parents in villages don’t speak to their female children who are going through puberty.” TDHS 2015 data shows that over half of women already experience sex before the age of 16.

The HakiElimu report also found another contributing factor to be the societal view of a girls child’s value is in being married and being a mother.

The TDHS 2015–16 report shows that fertility rates are strongly related to the level of education. It states that women with no education have 3.3 times more children than women with secondary education. Adolescent women with no education are 5 times more likely to have begun childbearing compared to those with secondary or higher education. TDHS 2010 as stated in the UNICEF report (p.12) found that for a majority of the girls who give birth while they are “still children themselves” are in fact not in school.

Are student-mothers key influencers of adolescent pregnancies?

According to the THDS, Zanzibar has a significantly low rate of adolescent pregnancies at 8% compared to mainland Tanzania. Zanzibar introduced a return to school policy in 2010 as a measure to reduce dropouts. Kenya is just in between Tanzania mainland and Zanzibar with 18% adolescent pregnancies. In both these places student mothers are going to school and the adolescent fertility is much lower.

Therefore the statement that student mothers returning to school will influence other students and lead to a rise in teenage pregnancies is MISLEADING. Most research around adolescent pregnancies attribute teen pregnancies to economic factors and the community attitude and upbringing of female children.

Do you want us to fact-check something a politician or other public figure has said about public finances? Fill this form, or reach out to us on any of the contacts below, and we’ll help ensure you’re not getting bamboozled.

This report was written by PesaCheck Fellow Mwegelo Kapinga, a development consultant, researcher and writer. Mwegelo has previously worked for Twaweza East Africa as a research analyst. The infographics are by PesaCheck Fellow Brian Wachanga, who is a Kenyan civic technologist interested in data visualisation. This report was edited by PesaCheck Managing Editor Eric Mugendi.

PesaCheck, co-founded by Catherine Gicheru, is East Africa’s first fact-checking initiative. It seeks to help the public separate fact from fiction in public pronouncements about the numbers that shape our world, with a special emphasis on pronouncements about public finances that shape government’s delivery of so-called ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ or SDG public services, such as healthcare, rural development and access to water / sanitation. PesaCheck also tests the accuracy of media reportage. To find out more about the project, visit pesacheck.org.

[syndicated profile] globalvoices_gender_feed

Posted by Mwegelo Kapinga

However, Tanzanian President John Magufuli thinks it will.

Credit: PesaCheck.org

This article was originally published on PesaCheck.org, East Africa’s first fact-checking initiative.

Tanzanian President John Magufuli has called for teen mothers who get pregnant while they are still in school to be banned from returning once they have given birth.

Speaking at a rally in Chalinze, a small town in the eastern region of Pwani, President Magufuli chastised NGOs in Tanzania for encouraging teenage mothers to go back to school, stating that they were “finishing the country” and leading to a state of “moral decay” in Tanzania:

If a girl gets pregnant, if it is deliberate or by accident, gives birth and then returns to school, she will teach these others who haven’t given birth that this is okay. The same girl can then go again and get pregnant, give birth and go back to school. And again for a third time. Are we educating parents?

The president added that teen moms attending either primary or secondary school would be banned from going back once they have given birth:

I want to tell them, and those NGOs as well, that during my administration, no girl who has given birth will be allowed to go back to school .

The president went on to say that teen mothers could go elsewhere if they want to get an education, such as the Vocational Educational and Training Authority, or even taking up farming.

The announcement sparked outrage on social media, with Tanzanians using the #ArudiShule hashtag to criticize the move, especially considering that over 8,000 Tanzanian girls drop out of school every year due to pregnancy according to a Human Rights Watch report.

So, the question is, do student-mothers influence other students’ reproductive behaviour?

PesaCheck has researched the issue, with input from citizen-centered initiative Twaweza, and finds that President Magufuli’s statement is MISLEADING for the following reasons:

Causes of adolescent pregnancies

According to the Tanzania Health and Demographic Survey (THDS) 2015–16 the rate of adolescent pregnancies in mainland Tanzania is considerably high at 27%. What factors contribute to this figure?

publication by HakiElimu found citizens opinion on the key contributors to teen pregnancies includes low household income. The publication states that nearly 31% of the respondents (including parents and teenage girls) thought that poverty was a key factor, with difficult economic situations driving parents to marry off their children as they are not able to meet the basic needs of the female children.

The THDS report also shows that fertility varies with economic levels, decreasing with increasing household wealth. Wealthier households also have a higher age at first birth, meaning that poorer households are more likely to have younger mothers, most likely of schoolgoing age.

Corroborating this fact, a UNICEF report shows that one in six young women aged 15–19 is married in Tanzania. These girls get affected psychologically, meaning that many of them are unable to return to school once they drop out.

Another factor in the HakiElimu publication was “poor upbringing and teenage girls own personal desires”. They found that some parents don’t spend time on their children’s morals and upbringing. Another finding was the lack of reproductive education which helps teens to fully understand puberty. “A lot of parents in villages don’t speak to their female children who are going through puberty.” TDHS 2015 data shows that over half of women already experience sex before the age of 16.

The HakiElimu report also found another contributing factor to be the societal view of a girls child’s value is in being married and being a mother.

The TDHS 2015–16 report shows that fertility rates are strongly related to the level of education. It states that women with no education have 3.3 times more children than women with secondary education. Adolescent women with no education are 5 times more likely to have begun childbearing compared to those with secondary or higher education. TDHS 2010 as stated in the UNICEF report (p.12) found that for a majority of the girls who give birth while they are “still children themselves” are in fact not in school.

Are student-mothers key influencers of adolescent pregnancies?

According to the THDS, Zanzibar has a significantly low rate of adolescent pregnancies at 8% compared to mainland Tanzania. Zanzibar introduced a return to school policy in 2010 as a measure to reduce dropouts. Kenya is just in between Tanzania mainland and Zanzibar with 18% adolescent pregnancies. In both these places student mothers are going to school and the adolescent fertility is much lower.

Therefore the statement that student mothers returning to school will influence other students and lead to a rise in teenage pregnancies is MISLEADING. Most research around adolescent pregnancies attribute teen pregnancies to economic factors and the community attitude and upbringing of female children.

Do you want us to fact-check something a politician or other public figure has said about public finances? Fill this form, or reach out to us on any of the contacts below, and we’ll help ensure you’re not getting bamboozled.

This report was written by PesaCheck Fellow Mwegelo Kapinga, a development consultant, researcher and writer. Mwegelo has previously worked for Twaweza East Africa as a research analyst. The infographics are by PesaCheck Fellow Brian Wachanga, who is a Kenyan civic technologist interested in data visualisation. This report was edited by PesaCheck Managing Editor Eric Mugendi.

PesaCheck, co-founded by Catherine Gicheru, is East Africa’s first fact-checking initiative. It seeks to help the public separate fact from fiction in public pronouncements about the numbers that shape our world, with a special emphasis on pronouncements about public finances that shape government’s delivery of so-called ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ or SDG public services, such as healthcare, rural development and access to water / sanitation. PesaCheck also tests the accuracy of media reportage. To find out more about the project, visit pesacheck.org.

sparowe: (Bible)
[personal profile] sparowe

God Will Do What is Right

 
Today's MP3

If you are rehashing the same hurt every chance you get with anyone who will listen, I have a question. Why are you doing God’s work for him? “Vengeance is mine,” God declared, “I will repay” (Hebrews 10:30 NKJV). To assume otherwise is to assume God can’t do it. When we strike back we are saying, I know vengeance is yours, God, but I just didn’t think you would punish enough. I thought I’d better take this situation into my own hands.

May I restate the obvious? If vengeance is God’s, then it is not ours. God has not asked us to settle the score or get even. Ever. Forgiveness is not saying the one who hurt you was right. Forgiveness is stating that God is fair and he will do what is right. After all, don’t we have enough things to do without trying to do God’s work too?

Read more When God Whispers Your Name

(no subject)

Aug. 17th, 2017 10:53 am
marina: (Default)
[personal profile] marina
So, I've had to tell local friends to stop sending me anti-fascist memes related to what's going on in the U.S. right now because I've just... reached the end of my cope? I've had to get off twitter for a while, because my mental health just can't keep up. But at the same time it feels like the world is burning and I desperately want to do something, and well.

I've decided what I'm going to do is just try to help people in whatever way I can, which always feels like a good course of action to me.

So, I have this Russian friend on twitter. She's fannish, her name is Sasha, her twitter account is locked. We met in Black Sails fandom earlier this year. She's very delightful and funny and lives in St. Petersburg.

This year she'd really like to get married. She and her girlfriend have been together for about 5 years. Needless to say, a marriage is not possible in Russia (or Ukraine, where her girlfriend is from). So, they've thought up a plan to travel to Denmark to get married later this year, and they've been raising money mostly through their Russian fandom friends, to make the trip possible. Russian fandom doesn't really do paypal (other money transfer methods are easier), so when I asked how I could help they basically opened an account with PP just for me.

There's no public post about this fundraiser, no kickstarter page. I honestly don't even want to link their account names on twitter to this public post, although I of course asked them what details I could share before writing about this on DW.

Anyway, if you're looking for the usual safeguards to make sure this isn't a scam - they're not really available in this case. I can only tell you that I know this person and trust them and I've helped their marriage fund and have no regrets.

So, if you'd like to throw some money their way, or signal boost this to your friends, their paypal address is: blindpilot at yandex dot ru

(Also, Sasha has pointed out that if you'd like more details about what the money is for, you're welcome to email her at that address.)

Dear FemslashEx Writer or Artist...

Aug. 16th, 2017 10:04 pm
rachelmanija: (Buffy: I kind of love you)
[personal profile] rachelmanija
Full letter with prompts to come ASAP. The letter below is incomplete.

Dear FemslashEx Writer or Artist,

Thank you so much for writing for me! This is my first time doing FemslashEx, so I'm really excited.

(I only requested art for one fandom; however, if anyone is moved to do an art treat for me in any of them, I would absolutely love that.)

Loves, DNWs, and notes/prompts for my fandoms (Aliens, Carrie, Original Work, Star Trek: Classic Timeline, and X/1999 below cut). Read more... )
ironymaiden: (dog)
[personal profile] ironymaiden posting in [community profile] scans_daily
I recently went down a rabbit hole about the fabulous, foul-mouthed Thori. and since my dog can also be a yelling arsehole...
i give you the heartwarming story of seven Yule puppies. )
[syndicated profile] su_herald_feed

Posted by rahirah

GROO: And that, my princess, is my story in full. When the Covenant summoned me I was vanquishing the Mogfan beast that bedevils the scum pits of Ur. CORDELIA: Uh, that's a great story. And you are a great groosalug. But, I'm not your princess. The truth is, I'm not anybody's princess. GROO: Have you not the curse? CORDELIA: The visions? Oh, yeah, I've got visions coming out of my ears, sometimes a little blood, too, but that doesn't make me a princess. That just makes me kind of weird.

~~Through The Looking Glass~~



[Drabbles & Short Fiction]
[Chaptered Fiction]
[Images, Audio & Video]
[Reviews & Recaps]
[Community Announcements]
[Fandom Discussions]

rahirah: (su_editor)
[personal profile] rahirah posting in [community profile] su_herald
GROO: And that, my princess, is my story in full. When the Covenant summoned me I was vanquishing the Mogfan beast that bedevils the scum pits of Ur. CORDELIA: Uh, that's a great story. And you are a great groosalug. But, I'm not your princess. The truth is, I'm not anybody's princess. GROO: Have you not the curse? CORDELIA: The visions? Oh, yeah, I've got visions coming out of my ears, sometimes a little blood, too, but that doesn't make me a princess. That just makes me kind of weird.

~~Through The Looking Glass~~



[Drabbles & Short Fiction]
[Chaptered Fiction]
[Images, Audio & Video]
[Reviews & Recaps]
[Community Announcements]
[Fandom Discussions]

Dear Femslash Creator,

Aug. 16th, 2017 09:45 pm
settiai: (Absinthe/'Nique -- settiai)
[personal profile] settiai
Just to note: my requests include Critical Role, Doctor Who, Dragon Age, Hunger Games, Mass Effect, and Crossovers.

First of all, relax! I'm far from being picky, and I can pretty much guarantee that I'll love whatever you decide to draw or write for me. These are nothing but guidelines, for you to take to heart or ignore to your heart's content. Also, hey! You're drawing and/or writing me femslash! What's not to love? ♥

That said, I thought that I'd elaborate a bit on my requests in case, like me, you're the type of person who likes to have something to work with. Feel free to use and/or ignore as much of this as you want. I've tried to include a mix of vague prompts as well as more detailed ones, to hopefully make things as helpful as possible whether you're drawing art or writing fic.

More details under the cut. )

Requests under the cut. )

The Trolley Problem (Adult, 1/1)

Aug. 16th, 2017 09:06 pm
nonelvis: Missy kissing Twelve (DW Twelve/Missy)
[personal profile] nonelvis posting in [community profile] dwfiction
Title: The Trolley Problem
Characters/Pairing(s): Twelfth Doctor/Missy/Simm!Master; brief appearances from Bill and Nardole
Rating: Adult
Word count: 7,131
Spoilers: through "The Doctor Falls"
Warnings: none
Beta: [personal profile] platypus
Summary: Two weeks and four ethical dilemmas in the life of Missy, Queen of Evil.

::xposted to [community profile] dwfiction and [livejournal.com profile] dwfiction, and archived at A Teaspoon And An Open Mind and Archive of Our Own

Read the fic

Housefilk Coming Sept 3!!

Aug. 16th, 2017 08:20 pm
sdelmonte: (Default)
[personal profile] sdelmonte posting in [community profile] filk
Hear ye, hear ye!
 
There will be a housefilk on Sunday, September 3 (the Sunday of Labor Day weekend) in Kew Gardens Hills in Queens, New York, at the home of [personal profile] sdelmonte and [personal profile] batyatoon  . The festivities will run from 1 pm to approximately 5 pm. The address is 144-32 71st Road, accessible from the LIE and GCP, and by subway and bus.
 
Interested? Reply to this post and let us know. And spread the word!
 
Need directions? E-mail me at simondelmonte @ gmail.com.
laughing_tree: (Seaworth)
[personal profile] laughing_tree posting in [community profile] scans_daily


Has anyone ever filmed a scene where a priest blesses his own saliva then gobs in a vampire's eye? -- Si Spurrier

Read more... )
icon_uk: (Default)
[personal profile] icon_uk posting in [community profile] scans_daily
After The Flintstones, it's perhaps no surprise they are shifting in the other direction temporally, and in giving us, in Novemeber...

The Jetsons )

'Faces'

Aug. 16th, 2017 06:26 pm
cyberghostface: (Two-Face)
[personal profile] cyberghostface posting in [community profile] scans_daily
 

Continuing Harvey Dent's 75th anniversary is Matt Wagner's 'Faces' from Legends of the Dark Knight #28-30. It's considered by a lot of people to be one of the definitive Two-Face stories. I'm personally on the fence; it's well-written and drawn but Harvey's character and overall motivations are fairly inconsistent with how he's usually depicted. The story might have been served better with a number of other Bat-villains instead. But who knows, you might think differently.  

Scans under the cut... )

(no subject)

Aug. 16th, 2017 03:26 pm
julian: Picture of Julian Street. (Default)
[personal profile] julian
I've lost my ability to drive for 7 hours straight at a time, which means that drives like the one I had yesterday telescope out to 11 hours, but other than that, I had a pretty good weekend+ in the Adirondacks.

I had had the vague impression that my sister-in-law's place was pretty small and uninteresting, but in fact, they own about 1,000 acres of land plus Sampson Pond itself, and have two small-but-well-sealed cabins right *on* the Pond, about 1 1/2 miles off the main road. It is gorgeous and I fell in love on the instant I got there. The fact the electricity and running water are generator powered means a) it's loud and b) more expensive, but it doesn't have to be /on/ all the time, and the expense isn't my problem, so that part was less annoying than I expected. The family originally bought it because they were timber barons off in Pennsylvania, and then some of the family split off and became more minor timber royalty (baronettes?), with way less land, off in New York instead.

They have a nicely symbiotic relationship with the local hunting association, who do some maintenance in return for ATV-and-fishing access.

There are canoes and rowboats and all manner of Things To Do on-Pond, plus some local touristy nonsense for those who are interested.

The Adirondacks have some high peak areas (over 4,000 feet) and some foothills, and a lot of hilly-but-mostly-lakes-and-rivers areas, which is where the Pond is. Sort of central-northern. I didn't get west of there, but in general, it feels like the White Mountains, only wetter and with more ground scrub than the Whites.

I didn't much care about (lack of) internet, although my SiL's family (on Verizon) got service while my brother and I (on Sprint) didn't, which irritated me only because I would either rather have A Phone Blackout or have everyone have phones and internet, and not this weird mixture.

Her uncle has been in the meaner version of A Course In Miracles for 5 years or so, in that he was at the monastery in Utah, where there are undoubtedly many wonderful things, but one is basically expected to never have negative thoughts ever, and if ones does, one should conquer them immediately, and if one can't, one is looked down upon vocally. (I extrapolate from a few discussions we (me and him and my brother & sister-in-law) had, and since I am not a CIM fan, I put a negative spin on it, but it's a reasonably accurate boiling down of some of what he said.) He's leaving in large part because they're moving to Mexico and he didn't like their place in Mexico last time he went, but he's still in the "they're mostly right about me" phase, and /hopefully/ will progress to "we were no longer good for each other" phase sooner rather than later. Though he's 70, so possibly not, but I hope so. He himself is steeped in psych and religion history and I want to get to know him better.

Best part of the weekend: Two nights spent on the pond (one on the dock, one in boats) with the aforementioned crew, star-watching. Saw a bunch of Perseids. Really quite amazing.

(My S-i-L's parents have a much earlier schedule than we do, so didn't join in. Her dad basically suddenly started waking up at 5 am about 10 years ago and can't seem to stop (I know a lot of older folks who need less sleep, which is different but similar), so her mom sticks with being somewhat closer to his schedule when possible. I enjoy them a lot, in a low key way.)

I was in a total news blackout for most of the weekend, so I figured war would break out or something. Instead, I had a vague awareness of Tiki torchlight parades, but then I re-emerged and we'd had protest clashes, deaths, and the President waffling around and then going full Both Sides Did It White Nationalist, which, while teeth-grindingly infuriating, is certainly better than war, but just proves we're having about 5 news cycles per day.

I will probably write up tourist nonsense from the trip over, maybe.

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